Assessment of landscape challenges and opportunities

A key output for the LP is a joint synthesis of the analyses and scenarios above, into an agreed assessment of priority landscape challenges and opportunities. Successful collaboration for ILM requires that all stakeholders have enough information to adequately negotiate and protect their interests, and that they also understand and respect the interests of other stakeholder groups.

Time is required for stakeholders to process the analyses and scenarios developed, from their own perspectives, and to exchange views directly with those who have different perspectives. This may involve a series of dialogues about the analyses or scenarios, joint walks across transects of the landscape to share perspectives, interpreting results of landscape assessments, or storytelling about stakeholders’ experiences.

The agreed assessment can be presented as a report, a visual diagram, a landscape ‘scorecard’ and/or a map, that can be understood by all stakeholder groups. A compelling assessment, broadly agreed, provides the basic foundation for developing a shared Vision and Plan.

Assessment of landscape challenges and opportunities

Assessment of landscape challenges and opportunities Tools

link

Adjust Group Size

  • Co-design
  • Guide

When facilitating interaction between stakeholders in multi-stakeholder partnerships, it is important to always be alert to who is talking. Even if contributions of a few participants are on-topic and relevant, facilitators need to ensure that the best possible contributions from all participants are heard and considered. This tool helps facilitators ensure a balance of small and full group work to keep everyone engaged and ensure that all participants effectively contribute.

link

Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) Guide: Situation Analysis

  • Guide

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) developed this site to provide resources and guidance for each step in implementing Climate-Smart Agriculture. The Situation Analysis section provides information on how to develop a shared understanding of the landscape amongst stakeholders and provides additional tools and examples. The tool focuses on quality assessment of the current state of the landscape, and therefore may offer guidance not only for this output, but also for output 2.2, context analysis, history, state and trends of the landscape.

link

Document and Summarize

  • Co-design
  • Guide

Documenting and summarizing are important habits often taken for granted or not used to their full potential. However, they can play key roles in supporting decision making within partnerships. This tool provides specific steps to ensure documenting and summarizing effectively capture ideas and ease the decision making process within a partnership.

link

Prioritize and Ranking

  • Co-design
  • Guide

​​This tool is convenient when trying to prioritize amongst different challenges and opportunities within the landscape. How will you decide together on which ideas to keep, and which ones to discard? This tool provides various simple yet systematic methods to do this.

link

Risk/Opportunity Scorecard

  • Guide

This table is found in the guide, “Public-Private-Civic Partnerships for Sustainable Landscapes” (p. 37, table 5). The table can be used as a template to help identify risks and opportunities that individual stakeholders face. It encourages the user to consider the magnitude, urgency and degree of control that stakeholders have over certain risks or opportunities in the landscape.

link

Theory U: Dialogue Interviews

  • Co-design
  • Guide

This step-by-step guide (also mentioned in output 5.2) teaches how to facilitate dialogue interviews and provides several examples to illustrate the process. Dialogue interviews engage the interviewee in a reflective and generative conversation and can be used to prepare for projects, workshops or capacity building programs.

link

Theory U: Listening Exercise

  • Guide

In this tool, you’ll find a video in which co-founder of the Presencing Institute, Otto Scharmer, describes four different levels of listening and explains how we can practice these different types of listening to become better leaders.

link

Theory U: Guided Journaling

  • Co-design
  • Guide

This guided journaling tool (also mentioned in output 5.2) leads participants through a self-reflective process during each phase of partnership development. This practice allows participants to access deeper levels of self-knowledge and to connect this knowledge to concrete actions. It can be used with groups of any size.

link

The Wheel of Multiple Perspectives

  • Co-design
  • Guide

By encouraging group members to rotate between roles, this tool helps groups see an issue from as many vantage points with as many nuances as possible. It is especially helpful when trying to consider diverging perspectives with regard to what is considered a challenge or an opportunity.

link

Visual Reminders

  • Co-design
  • Guide

A visual reminder is a generic name for a framework, diagram, or illustration that can help to capture and communicate complex issues. They are often used to help individuals clarify their own thinking or help a group of people understand what is being discussed and agreed upon.

Scroll to top