Shared vision for a thriving landscape

Once LP stakeholders have a comfortable level of shared understanding of the biophysical and social environment, the challenges and opportunities, and the motivations of other stakeholders, they are ready to develop a joint vision for the landscape. The landscape Vision should be long-term—a generation or more—the time required for transformative change. The high-level vision frames the desired future, the most valued features and functions of the landscape–for its people, its economy, and for nature.

The Vision is crafted to inspire a broad group of landscape stakeholders to collective action. For example, the Coffee Cultural Corridor in Colombia is merging goals for sustainable production and eco-tourism through a shared cultural history. A province in Yunnan China is pursuing a national reputation as a source of healthy, environmentally-friendly food products. A landscape in Bangladesh is pursuing a water-centric vision of sustainable development building on its unique geography.

Thus the Vision should be shared in a form that speaks clearly to all stakeholders, such as a short text, an illustration, or any other (creative) form or combination.

Shared vision for a thriving landscape

Shared vision for a thriving landscape Tools

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Inspiration: The story of alvelal's 20-year vision creation

  • Report

This story recounts how a diverse group of representatives in Spain’s Altiplano landscape came together to form a 20-year vision. It explains how they imagined what a future for their landscape could look like through a 2-day workshop held in 2014.

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Setting Goals and Objectives

  • Guide

This guide section explains how to incorporate goal setting in the visioning process to help guide stakeholders in exploring the changes needed to realize the vision. It gives the example of the ISLA landscape in Kenya whose LP developed actionable goals to realize its landscape vision.

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Visioning Tool

  • Co-design

This tool brings stakeholders together to develop a shared vision of the future. It can be adapted to help answer the question: “What do we want to see in place 20 years from now in this landscape partnership?”

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Why 20+ years?

  • Guide

This guide provides a clear explanation and case study demonstrating why landscape management must happen over the long term. It explains that for transformative change, landscape partners should expect to work on at least a two-decade timetable because although short-term action is critical to give people confidence, landscapes can only generate finance, reduce risks, create synergies, and establish coherent and stable management through long-term thinking.

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